JWST : An ambitious scientific space mission in which the University of Liège takes part


The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next great space science observatory after Hubble, is designed to answer critical questions about the Universe and make groundbreaking discoveries in all areas of astronomy. JWST will look further into our origins: from the formation of stars and planets to the birth of the first galaxies in the early universe. JWST is an international partnership between NASA, ESA and the Canadian Space Agency. The telescope will be launched on 22 December 2021 aboard an Ariane 5 from the Kourou base in French Guyana. The University of Liège and its researchers are involved in this ambitious scientific project.

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All ULiège news related to JWST  

Read all the news of the scientists of the University of Liege involved in research projects related to the JWST. 

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A window on the universe

First images from the James Webb Space Telescope: reaction of Michaël Gillon, astrophysicist  

"The image that touched me the most was the Carina Nebula. It is a demonstration of the power of human intelligence, curiosity and ingenuity as much as the magnificence of the Universe."

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Technical aspects

JWST: an ambitious mission  

The most ambitious scientific space mission to date to learn about the origins and composition of the Universe, gain a better understanding of exoplanetary systems and, perhaps, detect traces of life elsewhere!

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Scientific research

JWST : what ULiège researchers will observe  

ULiège researchers are eagerly awaiting the first data to be sent by JWST once it is fully deployed and operational.

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Studying exoplanets

Study of the Trappist-1 system and other targets  

Michaël Gillon, astrophysicist, will be involved in the first cycle of observations, which will target the Trappist-1 system discovered by his team in 2017.

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Planetary formation

Circumstellar disks and giant planets  

Olivier Absil, astrophysicist, will study the circumstellar disks that provide the 'fuel' for star formation.

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Cosmology

Dark matter and the expansion of the Universe  

Dominique Sluse, astrophysicist, is interested in the expansion of the universe and the nature of the dark matter that makes up 80% of our universe!

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The James Webb Space Telescope

A revolutionary telescope  

Yaël Nazé, astrophysicist at the ULiège, presents the major challenges of this extraordinary international mission.

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The launch of the JWST

The most complicated deployment in the history of satellites  

Gaëtan Kerschen, Aerospace Engineer, explains why the JWST deployment is the most complex in space history

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The JWST instruments

MIRI and NIRSpec instruments tested in CSL clean rooms  

Christophe Grodent, electromechanical engineer, looks back at the transition of the MIRI and NIRSpec instruments at the Centre Spatial de Liège (CSL) and the Liège Science Park.

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